Category Archives: Somalia

CHAN Qualifier: South Sudan 2-0 Somalia

30th April 2018
Championship of African Nations Qualifying, Preliminary Round 2nd Leg
Juba Stadium, Juba, South Sudan

South Sudan 2-0 Somalia

South Sudan completed a 4-1 aggregate win over Somalia in CHAN qualifying to progress to the next round where they will face Uganda. From our point of view it was a disappointing way for Somalia to complete the two-legged series with a second defeat following the narrow first leg loss.

After a goalless first half, strikes from Robert Wurube with a fine left-footed strike early in the second half, and then James Moga direct from a free-kick 15 minutes from the end secured the win for the hosts who had been comfortably on top throughout in front of an enthusiastic home crowd.

Highlights of the second leg are here:

This all means that Somalia remain firmly rooted to the bottom of the world rankings, as the chance for an escape has passed them by for the time being.

CHAN Qualifier: Somalia 1-2 South Sudan

22nd April 2018
Championship of African Nations Qualifying, Preliminary Round 1st Leg
El Hadj Hassan Gouled Aptidon Stadium, Djibouti City, Djibouti

Somalia 1-2 South Sudan

Somalia sadly failed to cling on to a draw in the opening leg of their Championship of African Nations preliminary round qualifier against South Sudan. The tournament is for players based domestically, which may make a difference to the stronger national sides in Africa, but has little bearing on the squads of the likes of Somalia.

In the match played in Djibouti due to the Somalian Civil War, South Sudan struck first as early as the sixth minute through James Moga, and a sense of inevitability set in for The Ocean Stars, as the Somali national team are nicknamed.

But they held firm throughout the remainder of the first half, and came back out after the break with a renewed vigour. They were rewarded for their endeavour within minutes of the restart thanks to an equaliser from Abas Amin Mohamed. Mohamed struck a fine effort from outside the penalty area after some neat approach play from the Ocean Stars, and the goal was celebrated with quite some gusto. It’s not often that a team such as Somalia get to celebrate a goal at all, let alone a fine hit like this one. At this point the prospect of a very encouraging draw was firmly on the cards.

That dream was a possibility for all of about a minute. That was all the time it took for South Sudan to restore their advantage, with Leon Uso Khamis putting the South Sudanese back in front at the first opportunity after a cross wasn’t dealt with by the Somali defence. It might be fair to say that the goal they scored, and the subsequent celebration, left the Somali players slightly unfocused on the task at hand.

Try as they might, Somalia were unable to come back again against what is clearly a superior opposition, if only marginally so. The tie is delicately poised ahead of next week’s second leg in Juba, but there is the niggling fear that this was an opportunity missed for Somalia to sneak off the bottom of the world rankings. At least they get another opportunity to do so next week.

Highlights of the rather short period when Somalia scored their fine equaliser and South Sudan got back ahead can be seen here:

AFCON Preliminaries

With the recent Africa Cup of Nations finals still fresh in the memory, it seems odd to be talking about the next tournament in two years’ time already, but when your interest is in the weakest of teams, qualifying can start early.

The next AFCON tournament has included a preliminary qualifying round to ensure the numbers for the main group stage of qualifying are even. And so six unfortunates have to play home and away clashes to remove three nations from qualifying. Continue reading

Steady Progress – of the wrong kind

A lack of action on the field for our group of unfortunates hasn’t meant there is nothing to report from a Worst in the World perspective. On the contrary, that lack of action means that all seven teams currently ranked at the foot of the world rankings. have been steadily clocking up additional months in that position. As a consequence each nation is climbing up the all-time worst in the world rankings.

For the uninitiated, this list doesn’t imply that the current worst teams are any better or worse than their predecessors on the field – they have all spent time as officially the worst national teams in the world after all. What it does do, however, is log how many published world rankings each nation sat at the bottom of. And this current lack of action for certainly six of the seven nations means they are adding to their tally significantly.

Here’s a brief rundown of what this all means for each of our worst in the world nations. Continue reading

AFCON 2017 Qualifier: Togo 5-0 Djibouti

4th September 2016
AFCON Qualifier
Stade de Kegue, Lome, Togo

Togo 5-0 Djibouti

togodjibouti1

Djibouti rounded off their African Cup of Nations qualifying campaign with a lacklustre 5-0 defeat in Togo, thus ensuring they finished with no points from their six games.

This handsome victory was also enough to push Togo into one of the best runners-up slots that secured them a place at next year’s finals. Tunisia hammered Liberia 4-1 to grab the automatic qualifying place for winning the group.

But such lofty ambitions are far from the thoughts of the Riverains de la Mer Rouge who are the only current Worst in the World nation to have had regular action over the last 12 months. Continue reading

2015: Worst in the World Year in Review

Sri Lanka vs Bhutan

2015 may not have been a year of many Worst in the World matches but it has seen a raft of changes to those struggling at the wrong end of the FIFA rankings. The year began with just Bhutan cut adrift from the other 208 members of FIFA as the lone, and therefore undisputed, worst national team in the world, with no ranking points and little hope. Continue reading

Somalia: The Ocean Stars seeking to rise from ruin

Through all of the troubles that Somalia has been through in the last couple of decades, the fate of their national football team, The Ocean Stars, was something of an irrelevance. That they recently sunk to the lowest rung of world football’s ladder is as much an indictment of the difficulties that had gone before then it is an assessment of the current crop of Somali players.

Their only recent action was in losing both legs of their World Cup qualifying first round tie with Niger, crashing out 6-0 on aggregate. The venue of their “home” leg tells the story of their problems. Continue reading